One example of why automatically feeding from Twitter to LinkedIn is a bad idea

I’m on a mission to stop people from automatically feeding all their Tweets to LinkedIn. It’s as much a rant as a mission, as my comments sometimes indicate:

Why do I think this is such a bad idea? My reasons are both unselfish and selfish.

The unselfish side of me wants to help people understand that LinkedIn’s greatest strength is that the audience is there specifically to garner useful information that helps them grow professionally or that helps their business grow. If you focus your message on that audience’s needs, you’ll have a tremendous opportunity to serve as a resource to them–and maybe ultimately have them chose to do business with, or refer others to, you.

The selfish side of me is tired of wading through irrelevant, out of context white noise that clutters my news feed. Take this–pulled from my LinkedIn news feed just yesterday (with names deleted to protect the not-so-innocent)–for example:

Because this person links ALL Tweets to LinkedIn, we get everything…even responses to other Tweets, even when we don’t have the context of the larger conversation to make sense of it, even though it may have nothing to do with the person’s professional life, which is the entire point of LinkedIn.

And here’s the problem: How is this at all helpful to this person’s network? What does it add to the conversation? Why in the world would I want to continue reading what this person has to say on LinkedIn?

Yes, there are times when sharing a Tweet on LinkedIn is a great idea, and a great way to stay efficient. But by no means always–and not even most of the time. Doing so may be convenient for you, but in the long run, it’s inconvenient for your audience, and it ultimately makes it less likely they’re going to focus on your message–or want to stay connected with you at all.

P.S. Same applies to FourSquare. Stop, please.

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